Don’t take the Dharma as a makeshift to solve immediate problems

From:Voice of longquan     Author:Voice of longquan     Time:2018-02-04 09:15:06
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Your attempt to improve mentality through Buddhist learning indicates deep roots of virtue in you. Yet occasional reading of Buddhist scriptures or casual chanting of Amitabha's name do no more than bring about a temporary and superficial change in your long-established notions, way of thinking, afflictions and temperament. So embark on an earnest, well-planned and long-term Buddhist learning; don't take the Dharma as a makeshift to solve immediate problems. Buddhist practice begins with finding a pure, harmonious and progressive team of teachers, teachings and companions. Guided by experienced teachers and accompanied by the virtuous fellow practitioners, you'll be likely to understand the profound meaning of the scriptures, and truly apply the teachings in your life.

Q: Mater, I feel very upset about the vulgarity in secular life and cannot live with it. Please instruct me, Master.

A: Extreme aloofness reveals a narrow mind, which is enclosed to others. It is you who separate yourself from the public, while the public never shuts you out. The truth of life is understood and followed only by few, yet it never denies the general public.


Q: Master, I often hear remarks like this: if all people renounced worldly affairs and became monks, the society would have no labor force. How do you respond?

A: Everyone in society fulfills respective obligations. Famers grow grains, workers manufacture tools; teachers impart knowledge, artists create beauty, and monks inspire wisdom and compassion in living beings. The whole society functions well with combined conditions and joint efforts from all professions. No profession stands alone and the hypothesis that all people engage in one profession is meaningless and unrealistic. 


Q: Master, neither my younger brother nor I have strong desire to make money. My primary concern is my own interest, so I feel tired of repetitive work, and my occasional and brief endurance of such work is merely for the sake of livelihood. My younger brother, a kind, soft and generous guy indeed, is learning to manage family business, despite himself. He hates his laziness and the cruelty prevailing among people; he sees no meaning in worldly affairs, but feels incapable of doing anything about it. Sometimes he uses entertainment as an escape from the reality. How do we stimulate our sense of responsibilities and aspiration?

A: All living beings, with no exception, are afflicted, mentally and physically. Some experience more physical suffering, some mental distress. We should learn the truth of suffering, identify its causes, vow to eliminate suffering in light of right methods, foster our capability through practice, and then make even greater aspiration to eliminate suffering of all other living beings. 


Q: Master, to learn Buddha Dharma, which scripture should I start with? Recently I become easily angered and cannot calm down.

A: Your attempt to improve mentality through Buddhist learning indicates deep roots of virtue in you. Yet occasional reading of Buddhist scriptures or casual chanting of Amitabha's name do no more than bring about a temporary and superficial change in your long-established notions, way of thinking, afflictions and temperament. So embark on an earnest, well-planned and long-term Buddhist learning; don't take the Dharma as a makeshift to solve immediate problems. Buddhist practice begins with finding a pure, harmonious and progressive team of teachers, teachings and companions. Guided by experienced teachers and accompanied by the virtuous fellow practitioners, you'll be likely to understand the profound meaning of the scriptures, and truly apply the teachings in your life. 

Editor:Bella Liu
Tags:extreme aloofness, truth of suffering, Dharma, makeshift

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