Buddhist learning is about learning the Buddha’s mind

From:Voice of Longquan     Author:Voice of Longquan     Time:2017-12-26 13:55:46
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Buddhist learning is about learning the Buddha’s mind rather than merely imitating his external behaviors. The result varies with any of the three factors – specific action, circumstances, and state of mind; regardless of circumstances and state of mind, mechanically copying Buddha's actions does not cleanse your bad karma.

Q: Master, I missed a lot of high school due to poor health. Then I did poorly on College Entrance Examinations and ended up with only a junior college degree. Poor education denies me any decent job. Not accepting this reality, I feel very bad when at work. I feel as if I am living in hell. How do I break free from suffering? Please help me, Master.  

A: If you do not let go of the past, you will surely miss the present. Accept reality and make the best of the present moment. 


Q: I prostrate myself before you, O Master! Is my being insulted and bullied by another person retribution for my evil deeds in past lives? If I stop the attack, does it mean that I lose the opportunity to eliminate my bad karma? If I am injured and call the police, am I creating evil karma by putting him in jail? Thank you, Master!

A: To eliminate bad karma does not mean that you have to allow yourself to be trampled upon; rather, it means we, when suffering, maintain inner peace, without a single evil thought arising. On the other hand, to prevent others from committing evil is indeed a kind act, if the driving force behind it is your compassion for the wrongdoer and your firm belief in the law of cause and effect, rather than any resentment or desire to seek revenge. This impulse, kind or evil, all lies in your heart. Buddhist learning is about learning the Buddha’s mind rather than merely imitating his external behaviors. The result varies with any of the three factors – specific action, circumstances, and state of mind; regardless of circumstances and state of mind, mechanically copying Buddha's actions does not cleanse your bad karma


Q: Master, though I have not received precepts, I have started a vegetarian diet this year. This morning, within the first bite I found meat in my breakfast, bought by someone else. I did not spit it out at that time, for this would have been embarrassing and I did not want to waste the food. I just finished the meal. After that I felt like vomiting for a long time. I am remorseful now. What should I do to remedy?

A: Accept others’ good intention and let go of the extreme attachment to a vegetarian diet.


Q: Master, what does being kind involve?

A: It involves no killing or hurting of any living being, no stealing or seeking personal gain at others’ expense, no sexual misconduct, no lying, no divisive talk, no harsh or senseless speech, no coveting, no hatred, and no delusion.

Editor:Bella Liu
Tags:Accept reality, Buddha’s mind,being kind,extreme attachment to a vegetarian diet

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